Toyota Sequoia 2021 – Review, Specs, Photos

2021 Toyota Sequoia: The Toyota Sequoia sees the addition a Nightshade edition for 2021. In addition a number of safety tech features, a new TRD Pro trim, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration were added for 2021. The Sequoia is a full-size SUV that seats 7 or 8 passengers depending on configuration. Competitors include the Chevrolet Suburban, Ford Expedition, and GMC Yukon. Rear-wheel-drive is standard with four-wheel-drive being optional. There are four trims: SR5, TRD Sport, TRD Pro, and Limited. There is only one engine available: A 5.7-liter V8 that makes 381 horsepower and pairs to a 6-speed automatic transmission. Maximum towing capacity is rated at 7,400 pounds. Full review and all information about the car – 2021 Toyota Sequoia.

New Toyota Sequoia 2021

Being a popular option once, the Toyota Sequoia now feels a bit obsolete as compared to more urbane rivals. The SUV went under several changes for the model year 2021 and following this development, the 2021 Toyota Sequoia will not undergo any major overhauls. However, Toyota will launch a new limited-edition Nightshade Package for the 2021 Sequoia. Saying that SUVs are on an absolute boom, is so 2014-15 now. Well, the craze for these elevated vehicles has been on a popularity spree for all the right reasons, be it the robust appeal, the elevated utility factor, or the go-anywhere factor. However, the sub-segment of the SUV segment that has proved its utility from time to time is the three-row SUV segment. Most of the three-row SUV in the market today provides you with the confidence of taking your wheels the unpaved way, with a whole lot of luggage, and your whole gang and crew. A number of brands have placed their bets in this segment, be it the Americans anomalous such as the Chevrolet or Ford, or European leviathans such as Land Rover or Audi. However, the JDM folks are not behind either. One such offering from a Japnese auto-marque that has been in the market for more than a decade now is the Toyota Sequoia. The Toyota Sequoia was introduced to the US market for the first and foremost time in the year 2000. The Toyota Sequoia represented the Japanese auto marque’s stepping stone in the popular full-size SUV segment. Being a popular option once, the Toyota Sequoia now feels a bit obsolete as compared to more urbane rivals. The SUV went under several changes for the model year 2021, but most of them were mainly focused on enhancing the tech-portion of the cabin. Also, 2021 marked the advent of the more off-road-ready TRD Pro Model. So now the question remains, will the Toyota Sequoia bring along any major changes for the year 2021? Let’s find out. Toyota Sequoia 2021 – photos colors and price in this article!

Interior

The cheap-looking plastics and gaudy controls continue to date the Sequoia’s cabin. The bigger-is-better knobs and conspicuous buttons are undeniably functional, though. Still, it notably skips modern features that are available on most rivals. These omissions include a heated steering wheel, head-up display, and massaging front seats. People who want a durable interior devoid of superfluous options will appreciate the Sequoia. Most everyone else will not. Thankfully, passenger space is plentiful, with comfortable legroom in all three rows. Likewise, the third row accepts adult frames without punishment. The Sequoia held a healthy amount of carry-on luggage behind the third row and with rear seats stowed. This is noteworthy because the Toyota doesn’t have an extended version for increased cargo capacity as some rivals such as the GMC Yukon XL and the Ford Expedition Max. It also has enough interior cubby storage to moonlight as a mobile yard sale. Toyota Sequoia 2021 – see the photo in the gallery on our website.

Exterior

The 2021 Toyota Sequoia doesn’t earn any points for its age. This basic design dates back more than a decade, and it wasn’t exactly pretty then. We score it at 3 out of 10, dialing a point from average for the low-rent interior and another point for being old. The 2021 Sequoia’s two-box shape is conventional, with a few curves to liven things up. Most trims look the same aside from dressier wheels the more you spend. This year’s new TRD Pro trim adds a honeycomb grille with “Toyota” stamped across the middle, cast-aluminum running boards, blacked-out exterior bits that look chunky, plus all-terrain tires that deliver the goods off-road. Inside, things go downhill with a quickness, and high-spec versions are hardly nicer. Painted silver trim dominates the awkwardly styled dash, which leaves the front-seat passenger feeling like they’re out on their own. The dash itself looks like it was designed for a truck with a bench seat, like the Tundra pickup it’s based on, but don’t go looking for one on the Sequoia’s options list.

Colors

The 2021 Toyota Sequoia doesn’t earn any points for its age. This basic design dates back more than a decade, and it wasn’t exactly pretty then. We score it at 3 out of 10, dialing a point from average for the low-rent interior and another point for being old. The 2021 Sequoia’s two-box shape is conventional, with a few curves to liven things up. Most trims look the same aside from dressier wheels the more you spend. This year’s new TRD Pro trim adds a honeycomb grille with “Toyota” stamped across the middle, cast-aluminum running boards, blacked-out exterior bits that look chunky, plus all-terrain tires that deliver the goods off-road. Inside, things go downhill with a quickness, and high-spec versions are hardly nicer. Painted silver trim dominates the awkwardly styled dash, which leaves the front-seat passenger feeling like they’re out on their own. The dash itself looks like it was designed for a truck with a bench seat, like the Tundra pickup it’s based on, but don’t go looking for one on the Sequoia’s options list.

Fuel economy

The Sequoia is a heavy drinker—of gasoline, that is. While many of its full-size classmates also have an insatiable thirst for fossil fuels, the Toyota has the worst EPA estimates and real-world fuel economy. The Sequoia we tested earned 16 mpg on our highway fuel-economy test route, 1 mpg shy of its government rating. That number is at least 2 mpg less than every other rival we evaluated.

Horsepower

The bulbous three-row Sequoia will barely squeeze into most suburban garages, and it offers room for up to eight passengers in three rows. Cargo space behind the third row is adequate. Fold the second and third rows flat and it’s spacious enough for just about any weekend hardware store run. The truck-based Sequoia is powered by a 5.7-liter V-8 rated at a healthy 381 horsepower, but its 6-speed automatic transmission is down on gears compared to rivals. That helps explain its dismal fuel economy, at least somewhat. With a towing rating as high as 7,400 pounds, the Sequoia won’t out-lug some beefier rivals, though it’s a stable hauler. This year’s upgraded TRD Pro is a formidable four-wheeler, at least for the handful of buyers who want impressive off-road capability in a big Toyota not named Land Cruiser. Most shoppers are best served with the entry-level Sequoia SR5. At upward of $50,000, it is not inexpensive, though newly standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility at least bring it up to par.

Technical specifications

The Toyota Sequoia is not going to get any major changes in 2021, and the 2021 model will be carried forward. Following these lines, the 2021 Toyota Sequoia will also get a singular engine option, which happens to be a 5.7L, naturally aspirated, V8 engine. The 5.7L V8 engine of the Toyota Sequoia belts out a punchy 381 horsepower, and a peak torque of 401 lb.-ft. The engine is further mated to a 6-speed automatic transmission that routes all the power to the rear wheels, which happens to be the SUV’s default drivetrain, or to all the 4 wheels when you opt for the optional 4WD configuration.

Price

SR5: $51,230; TRD Sport: $53,945; Limited: $60,240; TRD Pro: $65,355; Platinum: $67,270. The Toyota Sequoia’s base price is $51,230, which is higher than rivals such as the Nissan Armada and the Chevy Tahoe. However, the Sequoia is loaded with driver assists that include adaptive cruise control, automated emergency braking, and more. To maximize value versus its many more desirable competitors, we’d recommend the base SR5 trim. This model seats eight with a standard second-row bench seat instead of the seven-seat Sequoias with captain’s chairs. Adding four-wheel drive costs $3215 but provides four-season security for those who need it. The Premium package is the only significant option on the SR5; however, its content (leather interior, heated front seats, premium audio system, and more) don’t validate its $4325 price tag.

Safety

This generation of Sequoia has not been fully crash-tested. However, Toyota stuffs every model with a bunch of standard safety and driver-assistance technologies. While its competitors are available with the same features, they nearly all cost extra. This may help justify the Toyota’s questionable sticker price, but only for those who want driver assists in the first place. Key safety features include: Standard automated emergency braking; Standard lane-departure warning; Standard adaptive cruise control.

Motors

The Sequoia is available only with a 381-hp V-8 engine mated to a six-speed automatic transmission and either rear- or four-wheel drive. The Sequoia we tested was reasonably quick around town, with a responsive gas pedal and a smooth-shifting transmission. It also had plenty of power for highway merging or passing. Although the Sequoia is built upon a pickup-truck chassis, it still features a rear suspension with a modern design. While it adequately isolated us from the harshest bumps, too many shakes and rattles entered the cabin when driven on rough surfaces. None of its rivals are particularly fun to drive, but they either handle better or feel more composed. The Toyota’s light steering was easy to control in tight spaces and during highway cruising, but the nonexistent feedback further diminished its handling. The Sequoia’s brake pedal was easy to modulate and firmed up after initial inputs. The TRD Pro model has legitimate off-road equipment that includes a lifted suspension, beefy shock absorbers, and exclusive wheels with meatier tires.

Configurations

There’s plenty of room for the whole family and their gear inside the 2021 Toyota Sequoia. Just don’t look for Lexus-grade materials, even on range-topping versions that costly nearly $70,000. We rate the Sequoia at 6 out of 10, giving it points for its spacious confines for humans and their gear, but peeling one back for plastic trim that could pull double duty as an emery board. The Sequoia full-size SUV offers upward of 40 inches of leg room for front-seat and second-row passengers. The third row is tighter but still tolerable for adults, and climbing aboard isn’t too tough with the running boards standard on most trims. A bench seat is standard on the second row with captain’s chairs optional. Behind the third row, the Sequoia offers about 19 cubic feet of cargo space. With the third row flopped down, the cargo space is fairly flat and there’s room for nearly 67 cubes of goods. With the second row tumbled, that space nearly doubles to a hefty 120 cubic feet. Interior materials are subpar, with scratchy plastic trim on the dash and doors. Many versions have shiny silver plastic that looks like a throwback, and not in a charming way. The optional fake wood trim looks better by comparison, but it’s not convincing in the least.

Review

The 2021 Toyota Sequoia is a full-size SUV that’s been on sale since 2008. Unlike Toyota’s other large SUV, the Highlander, the Sequoia rides on a truck-based platform, sharing much with the Tundra full-size pickup. That truck platform, along with the Sequoia’s 381-horsepower 5.7-liter V8, gives it respectable tow and payload ratings, though expect to pay significantly more than the Highlander at the pump given the V8’s poor fuel economy. We don’t expect any major changes outside of the new limited-edition Nightshade package. The Nightshade package — also available on the Corolla sedan and hatchback, Camry, Sienna and 4Runner — is based on the midgrade Limited trim and packs an all-black leather interior and unique exterior trim including a dark chrome grille, black door handles and black mirrors. The package is available with two- or four-wheel drive. The Sequoia competes against a small handful of other truck-based SUVs including the all-new Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon. Other rivals include the Nissan Armada, Ford Expedition and the Toyota Land Cruiser.

Release date

The 2021 Toyota Sequoia is a big SUV, and we don’t just mean its footprint. Toyota asks a lot of money for the Sequoia, and it’s not a great value. We rate it at 5 out of 10, a perfectly average score now that it includes standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The base Sequoia SR5 runs about $51,200, and for that money buyers get a 7.0-inch touchscreen, a power moonroof, LED headlights, a roof rack, running boards, 18-inch wheels, cloth seats, and adaptive cruise control. Another $3,200 buys four-wheel drive. If you’re set on a Tundra, that’s the model we’d buy. The $9,000 upcharge for the Limited trim is a heck of a lot for leather seats, 20-inch wheels, and not much else. Go all in and the Sequoia Platinum can cost nearly $70,000 with four-wheel drive. It’s loaded up with a Blu-ray player, heated and cooled front seats, a heated second row, keyless ignition, and JBL speakers, but none of that really impresses for that hefty price. At $65,355, the new TRD Pro with standard four-wheel drive slots between the Limited and Platinum.

Video

The Toyota Sequoia can be referred to as the veteran of the full-size SUV segment, and the folks at Toyota seem to be in no mood of injecting new life in this dated contender of the segment that’s full of extremely urbane and intriguing sort of option. The 2021 Toyota Sequoia is going to be carried forward without any substantial changes from the preceding year. Thus, if you have your eyes on the Sequoia, it does not really make any difference to wait for the 2021 model, as you won’t be missing out on anything much in case you go for a 2021 model.

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